Sherry Taylor

Q: New research from the University of Rochester finds that people who do this are more likely to die earlier than those who don’t?
Q: New research from the University of Rochester finds that people who do this are more likely to die earlier than those who don’t?

A: hold in their feelings

HOLDING IN FEELINGS MAKES YOU DIE SOONER: Do you wear your heart on your sleeve? If you don’t, you may want to try it. New research finds that people who hold their feelings in are more likely to die sooner. Researchers from the University of Rochester found that people who held in their feelings were 35-percent more likely to die during a 12-year study period than those who spoke their minds. Those who kept quiet also had cancer and heart disease rates. Researchers say this effect may be because those who bottle their emotions may have a tendency to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol, and because pent up stress can increase inflammation levels and mess with your immune system. (Men’s Health)

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